WorldwideUKIrelandAustraliamore
media.info

How to find your next job in radio

The top ten things to do while looking for your next gig

By Larry Gifford
Posted 21 July 2015, 4.29am edt
Phil Campbell
Remove the ads and support us: GO PRO




There's nothing more certain in radio than change. Sometimes your face just doesn't fit; other times, it's worth looking for a new challenge. Larry Gifford, radio consultant and talent coach, has compiled the following ten things to do while searching for your next radio gig.

  1. Network. Most people end up getting jobs because of who they know. And you never know who is going to be the perfect “in” to get each job. So, connect with friends, colleagues, and old bosses on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Comb through your address book and reach out to folks from three jobs ago. The key is don’t ask or beg for a job, don’t bemoan your situation, simply ask for advice. When you ask for knowledge people are more emotionally vested in your success. Take people to lunch or coffee and pick their brains and ask them if there is anyone they can think of that you should know and see if they’ll introduce you.
  2. Apply for jobs. You are not above the hiring process. If you don’t apply managers assume you’re not interested. Don’t sit around waiting for the phone to ring. When you’re out of sight, you’re out of mind no matter how successful you were at one time. Find jobs that interest you and apply for them.
  3. Update your CV. If it has been a while since you’ve applied for a job make sure your CV reflects your most recent work experience. If you’re light on experience you might consider creating a functional CV over a chronological one. That allows you to focus on your skills and abilities. (Bonus Pro Tip: Spell check. Many hiring managers will eliminate candidates for spelling errors. The attention to detail you put into the materials you assemble to get a job is assumed to be as great or even superior to the attention to detail you’ll actually put into performing the job.)
  4. Customise materials. Having one cover letter or introduction email, one resume and one demo for all positions is a sure fire way to get placed into the circular file (garbage bin.) Do some research and address your materials to the right person. Avoid generic phrases like, “I’m seeking fulltime employment at a media company” and be specific about each job you’re applying for, “I want to be the night host on Crazy 96.6!” Rearrange your CV so the experiences and skills that apply most to the position you are seeking are reflected towards the top.
  5. Learn something new. Take this down time from employment as an opportunity to learn a new skill. Maybe you want to explore digital editing, know more about how radio research works or become an ace at Snapchat or Pinterest. Expand your skillsets while you have the time to dedicate to it. It will also ultimately make you a more attractive candidate.
  6. Don’t leave social media. One guy I recently spoke to told me he was waiting to see where he got hired to be active in social media again, because he knew he’d have to change his nickname. It’s your personal brand and your responsibility to cultivate it. In this new world of media, it is important that you remain active and engage on social media regardless if you’re employed. It helps you to remain relevant to fans and evolve your personal brand. It’s also a key factor in hiring. Hiring managers look at how many followers you have, how engaged you are with them, how often you post and what the content of your posts.
  7. Vanity search. Do a search for your name to see what comes up. You want to type in some keywords too. Try it a couple of different ways - “Larry Gifford,” “Larry Gifford, radio,” “Larry Gifford ESPN” and so forth. See what shows up and be prepared to address anything that does. This is one of the first thing hiring managers will do if your application piques their interest.
  8. Dress up. If you get an interview, dress up a notch or two from what you’d actually wear to the job. Trust me, how you present yourself matters. It just does.
  9. Ask questions. Always be curious. At the end of a phone conversation or in-person interview when the person interviewing you asks, “Do you have any questions?” Be ready to ask some questions. Curiosity is one of the most important attributes of a talent. This is a test. Don’t fail it.
  10. Sell yourself. This is not the time to be humble. The key is to leverage all the great attributes, skills and traits you bring to the table by positioning them to the your potential new boss through the lens of “this is how the company benefits with me in this position.” It’s actually less about you and more about how you help the company achieve its goals.

This isn’t an exhaustive list, so if you have more tips and suggestions please feel free to share below. Good luck on your job hunt.

Get media jobs in your email every day: get the media.info/daily for free

Larry Gifford — Larry Gifford is a radio management consultant and talent coach. He presents a weekly radio podcast, a newsletter, and blogs at his website.
Remove the ads and support us: GO PRO

Be the first to comment

Login or register to comment
It only takes a second with your Google or Facebook account.